Antiaging Atlanta

HGH - Human Growth Hormone

Note: I am no longer with Cenegenics

The first medical application of human growth hormone or HGH was as a treatment for children that would previously been affected by dwarfism due to a HGH or growth hormone deficiency. The next great benefit of HGH therapy appears to be in the aging population. Indeed, nearly 20,000 clinical studies conducted around the world document the broad benefits of pharmacological HGH therapy.

These studies suggest a wide range of effects when HGH or human growth hormone is replaced:

People with age-related deficiency of HGH or human growth hormone become

With human growth hormone many of these so-called signs of aging can be reversed.

Human Growth Hormone Research Articles

Harvard University Medical School

1. Advances in recombinant human growth hormone HGH replacement therapy in adults. Grinspoon, S. (1994)

It is now clear that human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency acquired by healthy aging adults is associated with significant changes in body composition, bone density, cholesterol levels, cardiovascular function and physical performance. Information is now available on the use of low doses of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) to reverse the negative effects of growth hormone deficiency in adults. Grinspoon, S. (1994). Advances in recombinant human growth hormone replacement therapy in adults [Electronic version]. MGH Neuroendocrine Clinical Center Bulletin, 2. Retrieved May 13, 2003, from http://pituitary.mgh.harvard.edu/e-f-944.htm.

Cambridge University School of Medicine

1. Long-term human growth hormone (hGH) replacement therapy normalizes body composition and also seems to have a favorable influence on insulin resistance.

This chapter is an overview of approximately fifty references focusing on the known benefits of human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation on muscle mass and body fat. Somatopause, or human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency in adults, is associated with abnormal average body composition, typically characterized by increased body fat, decreased muscle mass and insulin resistance. It is concluded that long-term human growth hormone (hGH) replacement therapy normalizes body composition and also seems to have a favorable influence on insulin resistance. Christiansen, J. & Vahl, N. (2000). Growth hormone and body composition [Electronic version]. In A. Juul & J.O.L. Joergensen (Eds.), Growth hormone in adults: Physiological and clinical aspects (pp. 222-232). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved May 15, 2003 from http://assets.cambridge.org/0521641888/sample/0521641888WSC00.PDF2.

2. Documentation regarding a physiological, age-related decline in spontaneous human growth hormone (hGH) release and IGF-I levels

This chapter reviews data from approximately 300 references confirming that there is a physiological, age-related decline in spontaneous human growth hormone (hGH) release and IGF-I levels. The decline begins around thirty years of age and continues into advanced old age. Elderly people have growth hormone and IGF-I levels indicating somatopause, a human growth hormone (HGH) deficiency. This physiological decline in human growth hormone and IGF-I is associated with adverse changes in body composition, such as diminished muscle and bone mass and increased intraabdominal fat, therefore increasing the risk of muscle weakness, osteoporosis, obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. In this context, increased disease risk is discussed. Highlighted are diseases that are exacerbated with age and often worsen the decline in somatotropic function, sometimes leading to adverse affects to the existing disease. O’Connor, K.G. & Blackman, M.R. (2000). Growth hormone and aging [Electronic version]. In A. Juul & J.O.L. Joergensen (Eds.), Growth hormone in adults: Physiological and clinical aspects (pp. 399-440). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved May 15, 2003 from http://assets.cambridge.org/0521641888/sample/0521641888WSC00.PDF.

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

1. Compares the difference in response to human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation between healthy aging adults and non-elderly adults with a pathological growth hormone deficiency. Munzer, T., Harman, S.M., Hess, P., Shapiro, E., Christmas, C., Bellantoni, M.F., et al. (2001).

The data collected in this study suggests that in healthy aging adults, human growth hormone (hGH) and /or sex hormone supplementation and modulation brings forth a positive response on decreasing body fat. This study compares the difference in response to human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation between healthy aging adults and non-elderly adults with a pathological growth hormone deficiency. Munzer, T., Harman, S.M., Hess, P., Shapiro, E., Christmas, C., Bellantoni, M.F., et al. (2001). Effects of GH and/or sex steroid administration on abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat in healthy aged women and men [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 86 (8), 3604-3610. Retrieved May 15, 2003 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11502785&dopt=Abstract.

The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)

1. A positive link between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the reduction of risk for bone fractures in postmenopausal women.

A positive link between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the reduction of risk for bone fractures in postmenopausal women was recently discovered by British researchers. This report summarizes their findings, revealing the significant increase in protection against bone fracture for women using hormone replacement therapy (HRT).
Banks, E., Beral, V., Reeves, G., Balkwill, A., Barnes, I., et al (2004). Fracture incidence in relation to the pattern of use of hormone therapy in postmenopausal women [Electronic version]. Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), 291 (18), pp. 2212-2220. Retrieved June 15, 2004, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15138243

2. A consistent linear relationship between slow wave sleep and the level of human growth hormone (hGH) in healthy men.

This study reveals that there is a consistent linear relationship between slow wave sleep and the level of human growth hormone (hGH) in healthy men. The data shows that during the natural aging process, slow wave sleep and human growth hormone (hGH) levels decline with the same chronology. Van Cauter, E., Leproult, R., & Plat, L. (2000). Age-related changes in slow wave sleep and REM sleep and relationship with growth hormone and cortisol levels in healthy men [Electronic version]. Journal of the American Medical Association, 284 (7), 861-868 . Retrieved May 15, 2003 from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10938176&dopt=Abstract

3. There are additive effects when testosterone and human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation are used in tandem.

The National Institute of Aging study pointed out that there are additive effects when testosterone and human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation are used in tandem. This synergy created positive results in body composition, strength and endurance for healthy aging men and women, with limited adverse effects. Blackman, M., Sorkin, J.D., Munzer, T., Bellantoni, M., Whitehead, J.B., Stevens, T.E., et al. (2002). Growth hormone and sex steroid administration in healthy aged women and men: A randomized controlled trial [Electronic version]. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 288 (18), 2282-2292. Retrieved May 15, 2003 from http://www.hmc.psu.edu/k30/archive/02-03_files/JAMA_hormones.pdf.

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

1. Effects of GH and or sex steroid administration on abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat in healthy aged women and men.

The data collected in this study suggests that in healthy aging adults, human growth hormone (hGH) and /or sex hormone supplementation and modulation brings forth a positive response on decreasing body fat. This study compares the difference in response to human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation between healthy aging adults and non-elderly adults with a pathological growth hormone deficiency. Munzer, T., Harman, S.M., Hess, P., Shapiro, E., Christmas, C., Bellantoni, M.F., et al. (2001). Effects of GH and/or sex steroid administration on abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat in healthy aged women and men [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 86 (8), 3604-3610. Retrieved May 15, 2003, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11502785&dopt=Abstract.

2. Insulin like growth factor I and growth hormone (HGH) treatment in HGH-deficient humans differential effects on protein glucose lipid and calcium metabolism.

Recombinant insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I) was compared and contrasted with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on their effects on a variety of metabolic paths. The study concluded that rhIGF-I and recombinant human growth hormone share similar effects on protein, muscle, and calcium metabolism. However, rhIGF-I and recombinant human growth hormone have different effects on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism when the young adult had a growth hormone deficiency. These differences may lead to a better selection of treatment modalities taking into consideration the desired outcome for the patient. Mauras, N., O’Brien, K.O., Welch, S., Rini, A., Helgeson, K., Viera, N.E., et al. (2000). Insulin-like growth factor I and growth hormone (GH) treatment in GH-deficient humans: differential effects on protein, glucose, lipid, and calcium metabolism [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 85 (4), 1686-1694. Retrieved July 21, 2003, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=10770216 .

3. The effect of 30 months of low-dose replacement therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (HGH) on insulin and C-peptide kinetics, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, and body composition in GH-deficient adults.

Rosenfalck, A.M., Maghsoudi, s., Fisker, S., Jorgensen, J.O., Christiansen, J.S., Hilsted, J., et al. (2000). The effect of 30 months of low-dose replacement therapy with recombinant human growth hormaone (rhGH) on insulin and C-peptide kinetics, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, and body composition in GH-deficient adults [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 85 (11), 4173-4181. Retrieved July 21, 2003, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11095450&dopt=Abstract .

4. Growth hormone HGH treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults.

Pfeifer, M., Verhovec, R., Zizek, B., Prezelj, J., Poredos, P., & Clayton, R.N., (1999). Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 84 (2), 453-457. Retrieved July 21, 2003, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10022400&dopt=Abstract .

5. Decrease in Carotid Intima-Media Thickness after One Year Growth Hormone (HGH) Treatment in Adults with GH Deficiency

Borson-Chazot, F., Serusclat, A., Kalfallah, Y., Ducottet, X., Sassolas, G., Bernard, S., et al. (1999). Decrease in carotid intima-media thickness after one year growth hormone (GH) treatment in adults with GH deficiency [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 84 (4), 1329-1333. Retrieved July 21, 2003, from
http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/84/4/1329 .

6. The effects of 10 years of recombinant human growth hormone (GH) in adult GH-deficient patients.

Gibney, J., Wallace, J.D., Spinks, T., Schnorr, L., Ranicar, A., Cuneo, R.C., et al. (1999). The effects of 10 years of recombinant human growth hormone (GH) in adult GH-deficient patients [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 84 (8), 2596-2602. Retrieved July 17, 2003, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10443645&dopt=Abstract .

7. The Australian Multicenter Trial of Growth Hormone (HGH) Treatment in GH-Deficient Adults.

Cuneo, R.C., Judd, S., Wallace, J.D., Perry-Keene, D., Burger, H., Lim-Tio, S., et al. (1998). The Australian multicenter trial of growth hormone (GH) treatment in GH-deficient adults [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 83 (1), 107-116. Retrieved July 17, 2003, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=9435425&dopt=Abstract .

8. Quality of life in adults with growth hormone (HGH) deficiency: response to treatment with recombinant human GH in a placebo-controlled 21-month trial.

Burman, P., Broman, J.E., Hetta, J., Wiklund, I., Erfuth, E.M., Hagg, E., et al. (1995). Quality of life in adults with growth hormone (GH) deficiency: response to treatment with recombinant human GH in a placebo-controlled 21-month trial [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 80 (12), 3585-3590. Retrieved July 21, 2003, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8530603&dopt=Abstract .

9. Treatment of adults with growth hormone (HGH) deficiency with recombinant human GH.

Bengtsson, B.A., Eden, S., Lonn, L., Kvist, H., Stokland, A., Lindstedt, G., et al. (1993). Treatment of adults with growth hormone (GH) deficiency with recombinant human GH [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 76 (2), 309-317. Retrieved July 21, 2003, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=8432773&dopt=Abstract .

10. Increased bone density after recombinant human growth hormone (HGH) therapy in adults with isolated HGH deficiency

O’Halloran, D.J., Tsatsoulis, A., Whitehouse, R.W., Holmes, S.J., Adams, J.E., & Shalet, S.M. (1993). Increased bone density after recombinant human growth hormone (GH) therapy in adults with isolated GH deficiency [Electronic version]. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 76 (5), 1344-1348. Retrieved July 21, 2003, from
http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/76/5/1344 .

Lancet

1. Beneficial effects of growth hormone treatment in HGH deficient adults.

A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study on the effects of human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation was carried out on twenty-two adults with growth hormone deficiency. The study concluded that human growth hormone (hGH), given in appropriate doses, has several potentially beneficial effects in growth hormone-deficient adults. This study from 1989 encouraged further long-term trials to further investigate the full benefits of human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation to growth hormone deficient adults. Jorgensen, J.O., Pedersen, S.A., Thuesen, L., Jorgensen, J., Ingemann-Hansen, T., Skakkebaek, N.E., et al. (1989). Beneficial effects of growth hormone treatment in GH-deficient adults [Electronic version]. Lancet, 1 (8649), 1221-1225. Retrieved July 17, 2003, from
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2566779&dopt=Abstract .

National Institute of Aging

1. There are additive effects when testosterone and human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation are used in tandem.

The National Institute of Aging study pointed out that there are additive effects when testosterone and human growth hormone (hGH) supplementation and modulation are used in tandem. This synergy created positive results in body composition, strength and endurance for healthy aging men and women, with limited adverse effects. Blackman, M., Sorkin, J.D., Munzer, T., Bellantoni, M., Whitehead, J.B., Stevens, T.E., et al. (2002). Growth hormone and sex steroid administration in healthy aged women and men: A randomized controlled trial [Electronic version]. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 288 (18), 2282-2292. Retrieved May 15, 2003 from http://www.hmc.psu.edu/k30/archive/02-03_files/JAMA_hormones.pdf.

 

 

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